bunnyjadwiga: (Default)
So, if you were going to attend a class (at Pennsic) on "10 Simple Medieval Herbs"
what herbs would you like to see covered?

What other information would you like to see covered?

Thanks.
bunnyjadwiga: (Default)
Extracted from the Word doc:

Food of Eastern Europe
http://www.gallowglass.org/jadwiga/SCA/slavic/slavicfood.html
What information do we have about Slavic, Hungarian, and Russian food in period? Some samples may be served. AS 4 Sat., 8/2, 2 PM
May be $1 or $2 depending on whether I have samples

Dayboards & Sideboards
http://www.gallowglass.org/jadwiga/SCA/cooking/dayboards.html
Tips and tricks for creating the SCA-specific lunch or dayboard, as well as a discussion of the period 'sideboard' type service.
AS 4 Sat., 8/2, 3 PM
Handouts $1

Using the Modern Library for Medieval Research
http://www.gallowglass.org/jadwiga/SCA/libraries.html
Discussion of techniques and tools to use for library research.
AS1 Sun., 8/3, 3 PM
Handout $1

Known World Librarians Meeting
If you are a librarian, a library groupie, a library, or anything like it, come join us for gossip, information exchange and fellowship.
AS 3 Sun., 8/3, 7 PM 3 hrs.

Scented Oils
http://www.gallowglass.org/jadwiga/herbs/oil&water.html
Use essential and fragrance oils to blend a body oil for yourself based on medieval scents. Discussion of pre-1650 scents and processes.
Materials ($4)
AS 13 Mon., 8/4, 11 AM- 2 hrs.

East Kingdom Herbalists and Apothecaries Guild Meeting
Meeting/discussion of East Kingdom and other herbalists. First 1/2 hour business meeting, followed by general discussion. AS 6 Mon., 8/4, 3 PM 2 hrs.

Wildly Weedy Herbs
http://www.gallowglass.org/jadwiga/herbs/weeds/
What weeds of today were useful medieval herbs, and how were they used? Walking not required.
AS 6 Mon., 8/4, 5 PM 1 hr.
Handouts $1

Medieval-style Mustards
http://www.gallowglass.org/jadwiga/herbs/Mustards.html
Hands-on mustard sauce making, with discussion of medieval recipes and techniques.
AS 13 Thur., 8/7, 12PM
$1 for supplies

New and Advanced Research Tools
Discussion of new and/or free tools available to aid in historical research, including citation managers, specialized search engines, sharing tools.
AS 4 Wed., 8/6, 12 PM
Handouts 25 cents

Behind* the Herb-Wife: Herbalism, Feminism and History
http://www.gallowglass.org/jadwiga/herbs/Beyond_herbwife.html
http://www.gallowglass.org/jadwiga/herbs/WomenMed.html
Lecture/discussion on the history of the herbalist and of women in healing, with particular attention to differences in modern historiography and popular views.
Age 13+
AS 4 Thur., 8/7, 3 PM
$1 for handout


*I'm pretty sure this was originally "Beyond the Herb-wife" but such are the vagaries of transcription.

As usual, handouts will be posted to my website, but I'll try to put the updates here too. The handouts posted here as of July 2 are schedule for fixing and updating!
bunnyjadwiga: (Default)
I think this is the handout I'm using for Wildly Weedy Herbs at Pennsic:
http://gallowglass.org/jadwiga/herbs/weeds/
bunnyjadwiga: (Default)
  1. Greens-- most popular in fall/winter and spring-- esp. mentioned for Lent
    1. Leeks
    2. Spinach
    3. Beet greens (aka swiss chard)
    4. Lettuces
    5. Cabbage/coleworts
      1. Note that broccoli, cauliflower, are late period and usually fall veg, though some broccoli & broccoli raab is now available in the spring
      2. brussels sprouts? who knows? the documentation we have is for cutting the baby cabbages that sprout from the stem after cabbage is harvested.
    Potherbs: used apparently all year round, incombination with (1)
    1. Parsley
    2. cress
    3. Turnip greens
    4. Mustardgreens and other potherbs
  2. Roots-- have a definite growing season, generally harvested in summer/fall; can be kept in cold storage/pickled
    1. onions (though scallions/green onions are available in the spring)
    2. garlic
    3. parsnips/carrots
    4. turnips/navews, etc
  3. Fruit
    1. Apples: season early August-mid-november
    2. Pears: July through frost
    3. Medlars: after frost
    4. Quinces: September-December
    5. Strawberries: May/June
    6. Blackberries: July through Michaelmas (Sept 29)
    7. Melons: midsummer through September
    8. mulberries: June/July
    9. Apricots?
    10. Peaches: Midsummer through september
    11. cherries: midsummer (July?)
    12. Sloes/plums: midsummer
    13. lingonberries, whortleberries, etc.
  4. Other Veg
    1. Lagenaria gourds: midsummer through Novembe
    2. Fava beans
    3. Peas: fresh-- May; dried: ?
    4. Asparagus: spring, esp. May
  5. Grains
    1. Barley: september?
    2. "Winter" Wheat: July-early august
    3. Rye
    4. Millet
    5. Oats
  6. Meat: available year-round, but slaughtering was also seasonal
    1. Kid
    2. Lamb: early lamb is spring-summer
    3. Mutton: year round, though most culling done in fall.
    4. Veal
    5. Beef: year round, though most culling done in fall.
    6. Pig: fattened and killed in November, usually
    7. Chicken: year round
    8. Game birds
    9. Venison
    10. Rabbits/Hares: available year round, though more plentiful in summer/early fall
These are rough estimates based on English sources, and current modern parameters.

Ok, so what else am I missing?
bunnyjadwiga: (Default)
What I want to cover:
  1. Spreading out the harvest
    1. diversity of cultivars
    2. early/late starting
    3. cool, dry storage
  2. Preservation Methods
    1.  Two main methods of preserving: excluding air, excluding moisture
    2.  Fermentation/other bacterial/chemical methods; and why it is a special case
  3. Drying
    1. Grains
    2. Fruits/vegs
    3. Meat/Fish
  4. Air exclusion/carbon dioxide
    1.   burying
    2. sealed containers
    3. fat or aspic
    4. other media, such as honey
  5. Salting/Pickling, Fermentation
    1.   salt
    2. vinegar
    3. alcohol
    4. fermentation
    5. cheese
  6. Sugar preservation
    1. qualities of sugar
    2. suckets, comfits & preserves
  7. Smoking: an add-on

Samples:
dried fruit
dried beef (not jerky)
dried peaches with sugar (de Nola)
pears in honey
keg sourkraut
pickles?
pear compote
candied lemon peel
sour cherry preserves

Comments and suggestions welcomed
bunnyjadwiga: (Default)
Using the Modern Library for Medieval Research
Sunday August 5, 4pm at AS 5
A discussion of techniques and tools to use for library research.
Handouts ($1) limited to 15 students.

Scented Oils
Sunday August 5 12 noon to 2 pm at AS 5
Use essential oils to blend a body oil for yourself. Discussion of
period scents and processes. Materials ($4) limited to 40 students.

Making Medieval Style Mustards
Monday August 6, 10 am-11 am, AS 4
Hands-on mustard sauce making, with discussion of medieval recipes and
techniques. Materials ($1.50) limited to 40.

Known World Librarians Gathering
Monday August 6, 7-9pm at AS 5
If you are a librarian, a library groupie, a library, or anything like
it, come join us for gossip, information exchange and fellowship.

Preserving the Harvest
Tuesday, August 7, 9am at AS 5
When were different foods harvested? How were they preserved? Some
food samples will be available. Handouts ($1) limited to 30.

East Kingdom Herbalists and Apothecaries Guild meeting
Tuesday August 7, 10am at AS 3
Join us for a meeting and discussion of herbal projects and methods,

Wildly Weedy Herbs
Wednesday August 8, 4pm at AS 5
What weeds of today were useful medieval herbs, and how were they
used? Walking not required. Handout and Materials ($1) limited to
15 students.

Beyond the Herb-Wife: Herbalism, Feminism and History
Lecture/discussion will discuss the history of the herbalist and of
women in healing, with particular attention to differences in modern
historiography and popular views. Handouts $1
Thursday August 9, 8am, AS 4
bunnyjadwiga: (Default)
One of the classes I'm teaching is "Wildly Weedy Herbs" (not on the
schedule yet, but it'll be Monday, 8/14, 5PM, AS04)

Description:
Period uses for plants that grow wild in North America; lawn weeds,
hedgerows, roadsides, parks, waste places. Also guidelines/suggestions
for gathering/ transplanting when appropriate. No walking required.

The plants I'm planning to cover are:
Plantain
Purslane
Chicory
Dandelion
Johnny-jump-ups
Violets
Chickweed
Celandine
Bedstraw and cleavers
Mugwort/Motherwort/Artemesias
Catnip
Roses
Mints
Yarrow
Tansy
Nettle
Teasel
Lamb's quarters /pigweed/fat hen
Ground Ivy/Alehoof
Mustard and Charlock

That seems like a good spread of things you can find growing around,
that I feel are easy to identify.

Anybody have questions/suggestions for me?
bunnyjadwiga: (Default)
Just so I don't forget, here's my Pennsic Class Schedule so far:

Medieval Mustards scheduled for Saturday 8/12 at 9:00 am,
Scented Oils on Sunday 8/13 at 3:00 pm,
Known World Librarian's Meeting on Monday 8/14 at 6:00 pm,
Historic Research in the Modern Library on Tuesday 8/15 at 9:00 am,
East Kingdom Herbalist & Apothecaries Guild Meeting on Tuesday 8/15 at 12:00 noon,
Herbal Sallets and Green Pottages on Thursday 8/17 at 10:00 am,
Medieval and Renaissance Hygiene on Thursday 8/17 at 11:00 am, and
Women and Medicine in Period on Friday 8/18 at 9:00 am

argh

May. 26th, 2006 10:19 am
bunnyjadwiga: (Default)
So, someone talked me into doing a class at Pennsic that I'd never done anywhere before and never thought of teaching before-- subject of my choice. I've thought of several but all of them took too much research to get to before this Pennsic

Ok, now I choose.
Wild, Weedy Herbs
Period uses for plants that grow wild in North America; lawn weeds, hedgerows, roadsides, parks, waste places. Also some guidelines and suggestions for gathering or transplanting when appropriate.

NYAH!

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